First Aid Kit

I have been involved with the preparedness movement for a long time. I grew up in the shadow of the Cold War during Reagan era. My dad was, and is, a big influence. He always had American Survivalist and Soldier of Fortune magazines around the house. He started getting big into the movement during the Carter administration, when many were convinced the nation would collapse under its own weight (similar to what we are seeing today). The Eighties were really the height of the Cold War tension. I know folks like to point to the Duck and Cover era of the 1960’s and the Cuban Missile Crisis; but by the Eighties, we had become inured to it. There was the US boycott of the 1980 Olympics in Moscow, the SDI Initiative, and Chernobyl. It was frightening to anyone paying attention. Somehow, we got through it.

Recognizing the warning signs, I chose to study nursing. Reading preparedness magazines, online articles, and books on the subject, I noticed that the two subjects most lacking from most preparedness individual’s and group knowledge pools are communications and medical knowledge and skills. I sought to rectify that by getting an amateur radio license and taking nursing school prerequisite courses. With that step completed, I applied for admission to a baccalaureate-level nursing program. My thought was that no matter what else happened, I would have the bachelor’s degree; and that I could apply for a clinical graduate program after.

The thing about nursing school is that it changes the way a person thinks, the same way that law school or engineering change the way one thinks. The process is slow; but when you’re done you look back and say, “Wow, that’s what I used to think?” It colors my preparedness and adds depth to my planning.

I also took private classes offered by local trainers outside of the college or university level. One local outfitter offered shooting classes taught by members of the 19th Special Forces Group. I came to know and befriend a few of them. Their influence in my preparations continues years later. One class offered by the now-closed FBMG outfitters was a weeklong class on emergency preparedness. It included rudiments of equipment, preparing for different types of disasters, convoy operations, selecting weapons, packing a three-day bag, and radio communications. I based the first aid kit in this article upon their recommendations and experience in Afghanistan, tempered by my own experience and education as a registered nurse. I recommend anyone carrying such a kit (as simple as it is) attend a quality first aid course; and I make no guarantees, expressly or implied, regarding the contents and present the information for educational experiences only.

First Aid Kit

Here are the contents of my patrol bag (“bug-out bag”, “get-out-of-Dodge bag”, etc.) first aid kit. I built this kit because many so-called “first aid kits” are little more than glorified boxes of Band-Aids, with little in the way of treating the kinds of injuries or ailments one might see seventy-two hours into an emergency situation. I did quite a bit of research, and put together what I consider the bare minimum for a patrol bag first aid kit. When you put together your own kit, consider the types of injuries you expect to treat. Are you preparing for evacuating from a hurricane? Are you hunkering down for a blizzard or ice storm? You have likely only built your kit to last about three days, the same as your bug-out bag. What happens on the seventy-third hour? You had better be where you were going and resupplied, or be limber enough to kiss your own ass goodbye. That’s the way it is in the survival game. The situation is unforgiving; and while willingness is a state of mind readiness is a matter of fact. There are no “do-overs” in a worst-case scenario. This is not a comic book or a video game. If you die you don’t “re-spawn” at the last checkpoint. There are the usual caveats: first, this is only my patrol bag kit. I have a much more extensive kit that at home, and in the car when I travel. Second, this kit is not to be confused with the blowout kit that I carry in a MOLLE pouch on my chest rig (Look for revisions to the blowout kit entry soon). That kit is for me if someone shoots me. It is not for anyone else.

The first aid kit, by contrast, is for treating me or other people. I do not mean it to be a catchall end of the world kit. It’s only to make life easier (or prolong it) until we can get a doc to take over. It’s still mostly a “boo boo kit” or “snivel kit” and not really appropriate for dealing with trauma or serious illness. It’s just to keep one comfortable when moving to a more suitable destination, whether rally point, bug-out location, or retreat. Finally, yes, all of these things do fit in the box, snugly, yes, but without bending or lifting the lid.

First is the box. I found it stuffed with mostly Band-Aids and other near-useless crap and sold as a first aid kit. It’s a sturdy box, with a gasket seal, and says it’s made in the States (always a plus, in my book). I don’t know how waterproof it really is, and I am not that anxious to find out. I’ve seen these advertised online, with the same contents that mine came with, for about twenty Federal Reserve Notes. I found mine for twelve at a gun show. I stripped out the contents, chucked most of it, and kept the box. I really like it. I have picked up a few more; and I will gladly take more if I can find them at that price to make duplicate kits. You don’t have to use a box like this, although I do recommend one with a gasket lid. Any appropriately sized pencil box will likely be sufficient. If the waterproof box seems like overkill it is because I think soggy, ruined first aid kits are no fun.

FAK open
Here are the kit’s contents:

1.) One pair of EMT shears.

2.) Twelve generic Benadryl (diphenhydramine) capsules

3.) Two 4 in. x 41/2 in. Tegaderm occlusive dressings

4.) One bottle Visine (Tetrahydrozoline Ophthalmic) with allergy relief

5.) Twelve Tylenol Cold tablets

6.) One bottle of ibuprofen

7.) Twelve generic bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol) tablets

Small Items

8.) Twelve loperamide tablets (Diamode, Diar-Aid, Imodium, Imotil, K-Pek II, Kaopectate II, Imodium A-D, Maalox Anti-Diarrheal, etc.)

9.) Five packets (two tablets each) replacement tablets

10.) One pair stainless steel fine-tipped tweezers

11.) Two pair Nitrile gloves

12.) One tube Krazy Glue

13.) One tube Blistex

14.) One Mylar space blanket

15.) One roll athletic tape*

15.) One small bottle of hand sanitizer

16.) Five butterfly bandages

17.) Assorted adhesive bandages

18.) One 1 ounce tube Neosporin (get the smallest tube you can find- a little goes a long way)

19.) One 4.5 in. x 3 yard gauze roll

FAK Items 2

20.) Two eye pads

21.) Four 4 in. x 4 in. dressings

22.) Two hemostatic dressings

23.) One Swedish military surplus pressure dressing (these are the smallest I have found)

24.) One 8-inch piece of Moleskin

25.) One elastic bandage*

* Be aware of any latex allergies you or your party may have before using these. Latex-free options are an alternative.

FAK large items

There you have it, one seventy-two hour first-aid kit, for bug-out bag or patrol pack, and suitable for treating most minor injuries in the field. About the only thing I would change at this point, I think, would be if I could find a roll of duct tape the same size as the athletic tape. I would want a roll, though, and not tape rewrapped around a pencil, cardboard, etc. I think a roll of tape is easier to use with wet, dirty, or shaky hands.

I also have four medical-related preps to my BOB, but outside the already strained kit: a bar of Phisoderm soap, a four ounce bottle of Betadine, a SAM-type splint, and four more pairs of Nitrile gloves in a Ziploc freezer bag. I am much more concerned lately with taking care not only of myself, but others in a disaster situation.

Shakeout AAR

Well, as expected, the Utah Shakeout was a farce. The department with whom I was to drill, didn’t. They conducted a first aid in-service, not that the in-service was bad, but there was no drill. I checked in with the county’s EOC fifteen minutes after the “quake” (because it was during a break in the training). Dispatch wondered where we were, that is, why I didn’t check in immediately. I told her we were all dead. That concluded my involvement with the drill.

The real highlight of the day was meeting with the observer from the county. She had a long look at my 2-meter mobile rig, saying that she wanted something like that for all of the county campuses. I have no hope that it will ever happen, mostly because it should.

To summarize, after “drilling” with the county for a day, I reiterate: You’re on your own. No one is coming for you. The system can’t take care of itself. No way is it taking care of John Q. Public.

Utah shakeout

At least an honest attempt at maybe getting ready:

http://www.shakeout.org/utah/

This purported to be Utah’s largest earthquake drill EVAR. I will be involved in some small official capacity, and am anxious to see how it goes. I will definitely be monitoring Utah ARES 2-meter nets. I was on the phone this week with a representative of Utah ARES. I asked what freqs they’d be using. He told me he was unsure at this time (less than a week before).

Frankly, I’m so busy with finals that I am unsure why I try sometimes.

I will take good notes and post an AAR after.

 

Utah gov announces earthquake preparedness week

http://www.heraldextra.com/news/local/article_78ba3218-40bb-11df-865e-001cc4c03286.html?mode=comments

The Associated Press Daily Herald | Posted: Monday, April 5, 2010 7:58 am

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah Gov. Gary Herbert has designated April 4-10 as Earthquake Preparedness Week.

A Web site provides tips on what to do in preparation for an earthquake and its aftermath.

The Utah Seismic Safety Commission says about 700 earthquakes, including aftershocks, occur every year in Utah.

Roughly 80 percent of the state’s population would be affected by a magnitude 7.0 earthquake on the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch Fault.

___

On the Net:

http://bereadyutah.gov

Know that this is just another effort to assuage the masses’ fears from the .gov. At best it will wake some people up to preparedness. At worst, folks that make “72-hour kits” prolong their lives by three miserable days.

The website above, http://bereadyutah.gov, is mostly garbage. Still, it might have some useful ideas.

Get that “72-hour” crap right out of your head. You’ll need a lot more than three days’ worth of food, water, toiletries, medicine, cash, etc. How much is up to you; but it should be enough to land you on your feet, without winding up at the FEMA/Red Cross camp shelter.

More craptasticness from Yahoo

So, Yahoo is saying to get your “disaster kit” in order. More pablum for the masses: “Don’t worry. We’ll take care of you.”

It doesn’t work that way. What did we learn from Katrina? You take care of yourself or you get an invitation to the Murderdome.

Read their tripe here: http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/health/preparing-a-disaster-kit-2467090/

Preparing a Disaster Kit

The recent earthquake and tsunami, and the subsequent fears over nuclear radiation have prompted many to turn to the Web for advice on disaster preparedness. Online lookups for “disaster kits” and “how to make a disaster kit” have both more than tripled during the past week.

In short, folks are wondering, what they should have in their kit? Opinions vary depending on what sort of disaster you happen to be preparing for. However, most experts, like the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Red Cross, agree that the following items are essential.

Water

This is the big one. You must have plenty of water. Just how much? FEMA, the disaster preparedness wing of the US Government, insists that you should have at least a three-day supply. A rule of thumb — have one gallon of water per person per day. If you happen to live in a hot climate, you’ll want to increase that amount. “Very hot temperatures can double the amount of water needed,” the site writes. Also, keep in mind that children, the elderly, nursing mothers, and people who are ill will need more water. Of course, you’ll want to store the water in non-breakable containers and keep an eye on the expiration date. Water doesn’t spoil in the traditional sense, but it can taste bad after a while.

First aid supplies

There’s no telling what you’ll be faced with in the wake of a disaster, but a few basic first aid supplies will certainly come in handy. Again, according to FEMA, you’ll want several bandages of various sizes, gauze pads, adhesive tape, scissors, tweezers, antiseptic, a thermometer, antiseptic, petroleum jelly, sunscreen, safety pins, and more. You’ll also want a good supply of non-prescription medication, including aspirin, anti-diarrhea medicine, antacid, laxative, and some poison control supplies. For a full list, check here.

Food

Like water, you’re going to want a healthy supply of non-perishable food should the unexpected happen. The American Red Cross writes that you should have a three-day supply ready in case you are forced to leave your home. And you should also have a two-week supply in the event that you stay in your home. Of course, the food should be easy to open and prepare.


Clothing and sanitation supplies

This mostly applies to people in cold-weather areas. Should disaster strike, have some warm clothes at the ready. You’ll want to have at least one complete change of clothes for each person. FEMA suggests a coat, sturdy shoes or boots, long pants, gloves, hat, scarf, thermal underwear, and rain gear. You’ll also want to have plenty of blankets, sunglasses, and various sanitation supplies like soap, toilet paper, detergent, and more.

Tools and special items

Just a few things you’ll want to have on you: battery operated radio and batteries, flashlight, cash, nonelectric can opener, pliers, compass, matches, signal flare, paper and pencil, wrench to shut off household gas and water, whistle, and map of the immediate area. Important documents like IDs, birth certificates, credit card information, prescription numbers, and extra eyeglasses are also good ideas. Again, this is just a partial list. For the full list, please visit FEMA.gov.

Learn it. Live it. Love it.

http://www.rural-revolution.com/2010/08/hoarding.html

All I can say is “Amen!” (unlike many blog entries, even the comments were golden). I’ve been thinking quite a bit about this lately. When folks call storing food “hoarding” it’s just so much sour grapes and shame. It’s simple, buy luxuries or lay up some extra needful things. Be prepared, or get caught flat-footed and hungry because you didn’t.

I read of folks in Houston in the hours before Rita’s landfall coming to a near riot because they couldn’t get plywood for their windows. Is it that hard to keep pre-cut pieces of plywood the garage, along with the bottled water and extra batteries? (ops, I guess it is).

My patience regarding the unprepared is wearing thin. Prepare for yourselves temporally and spiritually, or prepare yourself for a world of hurt at your local REMA or Red Cross shelter. One thing is certain: I won’t be there, and neither will my family.

Once more with feeling, “Carry your damned blowout kit!”

Lots of good stuff here. My advice is to not carry one blowout kit, but to carry two. Remember that your blowout kit is only for you. If you share it, what will someone use on you, when you get shot?

So yes, carry two blowout kits. One for you, and one to share. Its evidence is manifest once again. These things save lives. Yours doesn’t have to look exactly like mine; but at least read my rationales. Even if you don’t know how to use it, carry it anyway. Someone else there might just have the skills, but not the resources.

See my kit recommendations here: http://wp.me/prx0A-2i (contains both recommendations and peer-reviewed rationales)

Washington Post Staff Writers

Friday, January 21, 2011; 9:57 PM

TUCSON – Some of the first deputies to arrive at the scene of the Jan. 8 shooting rampage here described a scene of “silent chaos” on Friday, and they added that the carnage probably would have been much worse without the help of a $99 first-aid kit that recently became standard-issue.

Pima County Sheriff’s Department deputies said they were dispatched to what they believed was a routine shooting. But they arrived, they found a blood-drenched parking lot that looked more like the scene of a plane crash. Sgt. Gilberto Caudillo got on his radio and pleaded, “Send every ambulance you have out here.”

“Innocent people looked like they were just massacred,” Caudillo said Friday.

He was among about 10 sheriff’s deputies who found themselves doing the duties of paramedics rather than police. In the six minutes before paramedics flooded the site, they had to stanch chest wounds, open injured airways, apply tourniquets and try to calm down victims and the blood-covered bystanders who tried to help.

“We told them, ‘All the bad stuff is over, you’re safe. We’ll stay by your side,’ ” said Deputy Matthew Salmon.

In the end, 13 of those shot survived, while six did not. One of the injured, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) was the last person still hospitalized until Friday morning, when she was discharged and transported to a rehabilitation facility in Texas.

Doctors and law enforcement officials told reporters here that the incident would have been much worse without a small brown kit devised by David Kleinman, a SWAT team medic who had become concerned about rising violence.

Kleinman cobbled together the Individual First Aid Kits out of simple items used by combat medics in Iraq and Afghanistan: an emergency bandage pioneered by the Israeli army; a strip of gauze that contains a substance which coagulates blood on contact; a tactical tourniquet; shears that are sturdy and sharp enough to slice off victims’ clothing; and sealing material that works especially well on chest wounds.

The items in the kit were each inexpensive; the Israeli bandage, for example, cost only $6, but deputies reached for one “over and over at the scene,” Kleinman said.

It is unusual for police officers to carry such medical equipment, but Capt. Byron Gwaltney, who coordinated the sheriff’s office’s response to the shooting, said it proved crucial in this case because the deputies were the first to arrive.

“It would have been a lot worse” without those tools, Gwaltney said. The deputies were trained to use the kit, in a program the Pima force called “First Five Minutes,” six months ago.

The deputies who initially responded said they were not the ones who arrested the suspect, Jared Lee Loughner. Instead, their focus was conducting triage through the parking lot: figuring out who was dead, who was injured and who was simply a helpful person who had jumped in to help.

They used the tourniquets and gauze to stop the bleeding. They used a chest seal, also in the kit, to close bullet wounds. They used the shears in the kit to cut off the victims’ clothes.

“When I look back, I don’t know if we drowned out the moans to focus or if it was quiet,” said Deputy Ryan Inglett, who treated several victims with combat gauze and assisted in CPR. “This is something I will never forget.”

sandhya@washpost.com horwitzs@washpost.com

Edit: Here is a picture of the kit that the PCSD is using:

It’s a simple kit. I like a little bit more; but it will work.

Seventy-two hour kits, bug-out bags, and weight (Or, “How to assemble a list of ‘essentials’ so heavy it would give the Terminator a hernia”)

I’ve been reading a lot about seventy-two hour kits again lately. The lists of STUFF recommended by these so-called “authorities” (read: pointy-headed wogs that have never strapped on a pack in their lives) is astounding. There is no consideration given to weight or context. They take a one-size-fits-all approach, ending up with about two-hundred pounds of gear. Worse, these lists are copied-and-pasted throughout the blogosphere. Stop it. Stop copying and pasting without acknowledging reality. You’re going to get someone killed, hopefully just yourself.

Let’s consider weight. Yes, our military men and women routinely deploy with 120-pound rucksacks; and you know what? It’s entirely too much weight for a 20 year-old Ranger, who is so hard you could roller skate on him. If it’s too much weight for men that get paid to exercise, it’s too much weight for your average wheezing cube-dweller. Get realistic. For the last hundred years folks in the know have been advising our military (and armies throughout the world, actually) that forty pounds of gear is the extreme upper limit of what to carry for any extended period of time. Forty pounds, and that’s including your clothes, boots, rifle, and the weight of the pack itself. How much can you really carry?

Get your bag out. Now start as naked as you can get without scaring the dog and cat and step onto the scale. Add forty pounds to that weight. Boots, belts, and everyday-carry gear can really add up, can’t it? Now, go through your pack. Do you really need all of that? I am not going to begin to tell you what to carry, or to make a list for you. I hate pre-made lists. If you’re looking for that, go somewhere else. The internet is replete with asinine lists, with no context or purpose. Do not copy what you have not tested. Consider what you need to survive in the rule of threes. A person can survive:

  • 30 seconds without controlling serious bleeding
  • 3 minutes without oxygen
  • 3 hours without shelter in extreme hot/cold conditions
  • 3 days without water
  • 3 weeks without food

Prioritize and build your bag accordingly. It should all add up to about forty pounds (including your rifle), depending upon your physical condition.

Set limits that fit your physical fitness, age, location, companions, budget, and intentions. Where are you going? How are you getting there? This is why I say time and again, “Walking sucks”. Set your gear up in “lines”. Pre-pack everything so that you have it set up from what’s in your pockets, to what is in a pack or LBE, to boxes for the bed of your truck or trunk of your car, to a trailer or roof rack. Have plans for losing, stashing, or giving away all of it. That is, be prepared for going without the line below the one you’re currently using. If you lose your pack, use what is in your LBE. If you lose your LBE, use what is in your pockets. This is not an excuse to add weight to your person. Use what you have. If you don’t have the tool, you are. Use your skills and knowledge to make up the difference. Above all else say “And no more!” once you hit your weight limits, so every single tool is prioritized. Add the “nice-to-haves” to these other layers. Camp stoves, tents, heavy food supplies, extra first aid supplies, water, ammunition, wedding pictures, scrapbooks, whatever, it all goes here, in your car, truck, RV, pack mule, whatever. Keep your immediate-use gear light, handy, and pertinent.

I am not a fan of the “seventy-two hour kit”. First, there is no way of knowing how long you will be on your own in, or in the aftermath of, a disaster. My take is forever, or until the stores open again. You are on your own. No one is coming for you. FEMA and the Red Cross are not your friends. They will disarm you and put you at their mercy, feeding you what they feel like, when they feel like it. The ultimate goal of Survival Club is to live as close to the comfort level you are now for as long as possible. Let some other schmuck stand in line for an MRE and a cot in the corner of the Murderdome. If you are relying upon your “bug-out bag”, know what you’re doing and where you are going, in context.

Less Than Half of Essential Workers Willing to Report to Work During a Serious Pandemic, Study Finds

This might include everything from linemen, sanitation, and ER personnel, not just police, fire, and EMS.

http://tinyurl.com/39v6rjz

Less Than Half of Essential Workers Willing to Report to Work During a Serious Pandemic, Study Finds

ScienceDaily (Sep. 30, 2010) — Although first responders willingly put themselves in harm’s way during disasters, new research indicates that they may not be as willing — if the disaster is a potentially lethal pandemic.

In a recent study, researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health found that more than 50% of the first responders and other essential workers they surveyed might be absent from work during a serious pandemic, even if they were healthy.

The study, reported online in the October issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, involved over 1100 workers recruited from six essential workgroups, all located in the New York metropolitan area. The workgroups included hospital employees, police and fire department personnel, emergency medical services workers, public health workers, and correctional facility officers.

The researchers found that while 80% of the workers would be able (i.e., available) to report to duty, only 65% were willing. Taken together, less than 50% of these key workers were both willing and able to report to duty. According to the lead author, Dr. Robyn Gershon, Professor of Clinical Sociomedical Sciences and Associate Dean for Research Resources at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, and Faculty Affiliate at Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness, “these data indicate that non-illness related shortfalls among essential workers could be substantial.”

In anonymous surveys, workers reported on their willingness to work during a serious pandemic; the percent willing ranged from a high of 74% (public health workers) to a low of 56% (correctional workers). The researchers found that motivation to work during a serious pandemic was associated with workplace safety measures and trust in the employer’s ability to protect workers from harm. Workers were also more willing to report to duty if their employer provided them with respirators and pandemic vaccine and had an established pandemic plan. Willingness was also tied to past experience; essential workers who had responded to a previous disaster were significantly more willing to report during a pandemic.

The researchers found that workers’ ability or availability to work during a serious pandemic was closely linked to their personal obligations. Referred to as “dilemmas of loyalty,” otherwise healthy essential workers might stay at home to care for sick family members or their children — if schools are closed. Organizational policies and programs that help workers meet their personal obligations will also increase workers’ ability to work. “Even something as simple as ensuring that workers can communicate with their families while they are on duty, can have a big impact on both ability and willingness,” reports Dr. Gershon.

Even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) made workplace pandemic planning and training materials readily available, the Columbia study did not find much evidence of preparedness. Only a small proportion of the workers (9%) were aware of their organization’s pandemic plans, and only 15% had ever received pandemic influenza training at work. As Dr. Gershon notes, “the study findings suggest that these preparedness steps are important in building worker trust. Workers who trust that their employers can protect them during a communicable disease outbreak will be significantly more likely to come to work and perform their jobs- jobs that are vital to the safety, security and well-being of the entire community.”

To help ensure adequate staffing levels, employers should focus preparedness efforts on worker protection and the development of policies that facilitate the attendance of healthy workers. The authors suggest a number of relatively straightforward strategies that employers can take to support employees’ response during pandemic outbreaks. These include:

* Prepare a plan to quickly and easily vaccinate essential workers and their families, so that when a vaccine is available it can be readily distributed.
* Discuss respiratory protection needs with public health officials. They can provide guidance on the need, feasibility, and use of these safety devices.

Guidance on planning is available from CDC-funded Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers, such as the one at Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of ScienceDaily or its staff.

It’s something to consider when planning for an emergency: you’re on your own. Period. Forget about the whole “just three days” garbage. Forget the cavalry. Forget FEMA and DHS. They’re not on your side. No, you may be on your own for a very long time- weeks to months for a pandemic. How can we plan accordingly?

If there are people in your families and neighborhoods that you would like to see working in the aftermath of a WCS-event (not just fire, police, and EMS, but also folks in sanitation, power linemen, nurses, ER docs, etc.) think about what you can do to help with their families. Everyone wants to say “I’m taking care of my family first”. I agree with that; but what can you do to help these men and women feel a little better about leaving their families behind? Would you help watch their children, assuming you didn’t have to work, too?

I think it would go a long way to helping our neighborhoods if we could all pitch in a little in that event. Let’s assume that 8+ earthquake hits in the SL Valley. If your neighbor is an ER nurse, wouldn’t you want him or her at work? If I had a job that I know would be on hold in the aftermath, I’d gladly help mind the kids, same goes for any good neighbor expected to work in the aftermath of an emergency.

I see this as an opportunity to strengthen communities and put in a little Christian service.

We’re on our own; but that doesn’t mean we have to live in a bubble.

Blowout kit light stick

The only real feedback I have heard so far about the new blowout kit essay is regarding sizing the NPA and OPA. I will get some pictures up showing how to size them appropriately tonight, if I don’t have to fight with the light too much.

Here is an addendum showing how (and why) I stuck that light stick in that Ziploc bag. I hope you enjoy it.

In the blowout kit essay, the photos demonstrate some of the contents of the kit in a Ziploc freezer bag. This is so that one can grab the bag and have enough of the contents all at once to treat a wound without having to fumble for the smaller items. The text notes, and one picture shows, a blue cyalume light stick adhered to the bottom of the bag. This work will explain how to do it, and attempt to explain the rationale.

Firearms trainers will tell one that a majority of shootings happen at night. Tracking down credible statistics is difficult. On the other hand, half of all time is night. Regardless of the probability, the possibility is there that one will become hurt, possibly grievously so, at night. Car accidents and assaults often occur at night. We should be able then to treat a wound in the dark. It might not be smart to attempt this with a handheld tactical light. First, they are far too bright to use without ruining the night vision of all involved parties. Second, they make using two hands to treat yourself (or to treat your buddy with his blowout kit) difficult. A headlamp is a viable option, but I am including a light stick for two reasons. First, you can use the light to find your other light (headlamp or small LED with blue filters). One can use it to see immediately all of the contents of the bag. Grab it. Break it. Shake it. The contents of the bag are visible. Again, blue is the preferred color because it does not wash out blood the way a red stick, for example, would. Creating a shade for the stick puts the light where it is most effective, on the contents of the bag. It is conceivable that one could be treating that same buddy in a hostile environment. As such, the light needs to go in one direction. Light discipline is something one should always consider before the fact.

Start with an unwrapped blue cyalume light stick. The directions on the package instruct the user not to open the pouch until just before use. Research reveals two points to their rationale. First, the pouch has a positive pressure. The gas inside the package protects the ampule inside the stick from breaking accidentally (this ampule contains the active ingredient that starts the chemical reaction that generates the light). Second, the ingredients do not react favorably to sunlight. Exposure to the sun diminishes the effectiveness of the light stick. Replacing the stick at least annually should mitigate this.

Tear off a narrow strip of aluminum foil (figure one). This will be the reflector. Aerosol 3M Super 77 is the adhesive used throughout this project (figure two). One can use it to create temporary or permanent bonds. Since this project has one of each, it was a perfect choice. Spray the shiny side of the aluminum foil and wait a few minutes for it to become tacky. Then place the light stick on the foil along its midline, with the loop facing down (figure three). Carefully smooth the piece of aluminum foil over one-half of the light stick (figure four).  Use a razor or utility knife to cut away the excess foil (figure five). Next, perform a similar procedure with a piece of gaffer’s or duct tape (gaffer’s being preferred). Carefully cover the aluminum foil and cut away the difference. Your light stick is finished (figure six). Finally spray some adhesive on the stick. Since you are only putting it on one surface, you will be able to remove it easily later. Push the light stick against the bottom of the bag, in line with the seam (figure seven).

light stick

(Figure one, the new stick and aluminum foil)

Super 77

(Figure two, 3M Super 77 adhesive)

foil stick

(Figure three, the light stick on the foil)

end view

(Figure four, carefully cover half of the light stick)

trimmed

(Figure five, trim away the excess foil)

taped

(Figure six, tape over the foil)

inside

(Figure seven, adhere the light stick to the bottom of the bag)

This process takes more time to describe than to perform. When finished, you will have an effective battery-free light in your blowout kit, where it will do the most good. The more preparations made before an emergency, the greater the odds of survival. When building a kit whose contents are strictly to treat serious bodily injury, a few moments of preparation are preferable to the alternative.